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PHP AND EARLY VERSIONS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PHP development began in 1994 when Rasmus Lerdorf wrote a series of Common Gateway Interface (CGI) binaries in C, which he used to maintain his personal homepage. He extended them to add the ability to work with web forms and to communicate with databases, and called this implementation “Personal Home Page/Forms Interpreter” or PHP/FI.

PHP/FI could be used to build simple, dynamic web applications. Lerdorf initially announced the release of PHP/FI as “Personal Home Page Tools (PHP Tools) version 1.0” publicly to accelerate bug location and improve the code, on the Usenet discussion group comp.infosystems.www.authoring.cgi on June 8, 1995. This release already had the basic functionality that PHP has as of 2013. This included Perl-like variables, form handling, and the ability to embed HTML. The syntax resembled that of Perl but was simpler, more limited and less consistent.

Early PHP was not intended to be a new programming language, and grew organically, with Lerdorf noting in retrospect: “I don’t know how to stop it, there was never any intent to write a programming language […] I have absolutely no idea how to write a programming language, I just kept adding the next logical step on the way.”[16] A development team began to form and, after months of work and beta testing, officially released PHP/FI 2 in November 1997.

One criticism of PHP is that it was not originally designed, but instead it was developed organically; among other things, this has led to inconsistent naming of functions and inconsistent ordering of their parameters. In some cases, the function names were chosen to match the lower-level libraries which PHP was “wrapping”, while in some very early versions of PHP the length of the function names was used internally as a hash function, so names were chosen to improve the distribution of hash values.

PHP 3 and 4

Zeev Suraski and Andi Gutmans rewrote the parser in 1997 and formed the base of PHP 3, changing the language’s name to the recursive acronym PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor.Afterwards, public testing of PHP 3 began, and the official launch came in June 1998. Suraski and Gutmans then started a new rewrite of PHP’s core, producing the Zend Engine in 1999. They also founded Zend Technologies in Ramat Gan, Israel.

On May 22, 2000, PHP 4, powered by the Zend Engine 1.0, was released. As of August 2008 this branch reached version 4.4.9. PHP 4 is no longer under development nor will any security updates be released.

PHP 5

On July 13, 2004, PHP 5 was released, powered by the new Zend Engine II. PHP 5 included new features such as improved support for object-oriented programming, the PHP Data Objects (PDO) extension (which defines a lightweight and consistent interface for accessing databases), and numerous performance enhancements. In 2008 PHP 5 became the only stable version under development. Late static binding had been missing from PHP and was added in version 5.3.

Many high-profile open-source projects ceased to support PHP 4 in new code as of February 5, 2008, because of the GoPHP5 initiative, provided by a consortium of PHP developers promoting the transition from PHP 4 to PHP 5.

Over time, PHP interpreters became available on most existing 32-bit and 64-bit operating systems, either by building them from the PHP source code, or by using pre-built binaries. For the PHP versions 5.3 and 5.4, the only available Microsoft Windows binary distributions were 32-bit x86 builds, requiring Windows 32-bit compatibility mode while using Internet Information Services (IIS) on a 64-bit Windows platform. PHP version 5.5 made the 64-bit x86-64 builds available for Microsoft Windows.

PHP 6 and Unicode[edit]

PHP received mixed reviews due to lacking native Unicode support at the core language level.[33][34] In 2005, a project headed by Andrei Zmievski was initiated to bring native Unicode support throughout PHP, by embedding the International Components for Unicode (ICU) library, and representing text strings as UTF-16 internally. Since this would cause major changes both to the internals of the language and to user code, it was planned to release this as version 6.0 of the language, along with other major features then in development.

However, a shortage of developers who understood the necessary changes, and performance problems arising from conversion to and from UTF-16, which is rarely used in a web context, led to delays in the project.[37] As a result, a PHP 5.3 release was created in 2009, with many non-Unicode features back-ported from PHP 6, notably namespaces. In March 2010, the project in its current form was officially abandoned, and a PHP 5.4 release was prepared containing most remaining non-Unicode features from PHP 6, such as traits and closure re-binding.[38] Initial hopes were that a new plan would be formed for Unicode integration, but as of 2014 none has been adopted.

PHP 7[edit]

As of 2015, work is underway on a new major PHP version named PHP 7. There was some dispute as to whether the next major version of PHP was to be called PHP 6 or PHP 7. While the PHP 6 Unicode experiment had never been released, a number of articles and book titles referenced the old PHP 6 name, which might have caused confusion if a new release were to reuse the PHP 6 name. After a vote, the name PHP 7 was chosen.

PHP 7 gets its foundations from an experimental PHP branch that was originally named phpng (PHP next generation), which aims at optimizing PHP performance by refactoring the Zend Engine while retaining near-complete language compatibility. As of 14 July 2014, WordPress-based benchmarks, which serve as the main benchmark suite for the phpng project, show an almost 100% increase in performance. Changes from phpng are also expected to make it easier to improve performance in the future, as more compact data structures and other changes are seen as better suited for a successful migration to a just-in-time (JIT) compiler. Because of the significant changes, this reworked Zend Engine will be called Zend Engine 3, succeeding the Zend Engine 2 used in PHP 5.

Because of phpng’s major internal changes, it would have to go into a new major version of PHP, rather than a minor 5.x release, according to PHP’s release process,[44] thus spawning PHP 7. Major versions of PHP are allowed to break code backwards-compatibility, and so PHP 7 presented an opportunity to make other improvements beyond phpng that require backwards-compatibility breaks. In particular, the following backwards-compatibility breaks were made:

Many “fatal” or “recoverable”-level legacy PHP “errors” were replaced with modern object-oriented exceptions[45]

The syntax for variable dereferencing was reworked to be more internally consistent and complete, allowing the use of ->, [], (), {}, and :: operators with arbitrary meaningful left-hand-side expressions

Support for legacy PHP 4-style constructor methods was deprecated
The behaviour of the foreach statement was changed to be more predictable

Constructors for the few classes built-in to PHP which returned null upon failure were changed to throw an exception instead, for consistency

Several unmaintained or deprecated SAPIs and extensions were removed from the PHP core, most notably the legacy mysql extension

The behaviour of the list() operator was changed to remove support for strings

Support for legacy ASP-style PHP code delimeters (<% and %>, <script language=php> and </script>) was removed

An oversight allowing a switch statement to have multiple default clauses was fixed

Support for hexadecimal number support in some implicit conversions from strings to number types was removed

The left-shift and right-shift operators were changed to behave more consistently across platforms

Conversions between integers and floating point numbers were tightened and made more consistent across platforms.

PHP 7 will also include new language features. Most notably, it will introduce return type declarations, which will complement its existing parameter type declarations, and support for the scalar types (integer, float, string and boolean) in parameter and return type declarations.

Content taken from wikipedia.com

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